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in changing religious laws in america, i guess? >> guest: well, the salvation army, which people don't realize, is an evangelical religious group, not just a group that rings bells outside department stores in the christmas season. the salvation army believed in what they called the cathedral of the open air and would go into areas, especially impoverished areas, and have parades and make lots of noise with brass bands and cymbals, and loud preaching trying to attract, especially the urban poor, back into religious life. this came up against requirements of many cities that any parade be permitted, and the salvation army made it a practice not to apply for permits, and to be arrested, often playing instruments into the way into the cell, and challenges laws as anti-religious, and they won and lost a lot of them. they destabilized the law of the states by challenging these restrictions, and they never really made it to the supreme court of the united states, though, because the states were still in power. >> host: professor gordon, when did the first major religious case come before the supreme
and women never returned home. and the additional millions that supported the war efforts from america's arsenal of democracy on this home front. the world war ii fought the most destructive war in history. they thought that war against great odds. not only did they fight and win that war and save this nation, but they literally saved the world. this nation will never forget our world war ii veterans, all of our veterans and their families and especially those who gave all their tomorrows. as the 18 or 19-year old, all of pur tomorrow's is a high rice to play so we can live in beautiful america we are proud to call home. god bless our world war ii veterans, their families, all of our veterans. the protect -- we pray god will protect those serving in our armed forces and the families they have to leave behind. god bless america. thank you very much. [applause] but ladies and gentlemen, we are privileged to have with us members of the united states marine band brass quintets who will now perform the musical patriotic salute to our veterans. ♪ [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, another
at this is basically something that you can ride along and freeload and let america and canada and japan handled? >> steve, your question -- >> i'm and freeload, by the way. >> that by the way is how the chinese would describe any relationship between japan and america. the interesting aspect of all these conflicts is that as india and china and india and china have a proximate geographically, but we've never been neighbors. >> right. >> in order to be neighbors you either have to love each other or hate each other. we have done neither. in fact, in 1962 during the first strategic conflict, between these two, you have to understand, it's hard to understand why we are not neighbors. [inaudible] in terms of inaccessible. but the positions, the lines, the strategies, the lines, what would they resonate to? the positions that are taken by postcolonial nations is that we will not be bound by decisions made by colonial powers. one, or in china's case, that we had to abandon our national positions. and now that we are strong, we need to resurrect them. right or wrong is not, that is very little to do w
of "bbc world news america." this community is warning the loss of 26 people including 20 children killed in a school on friday. it has ignited a debate about gun control in america. today was about the children, i got little noah and little jack pinto, to six girls who were buried today. it should a community struggling with grief and with shock. we have the latest. >> the agony of this week town was almost unbearable. first jack pinto was also buried. the town will hold the funerals of 80 more small victims of horrific violence. the parents of one of them have been speaking of their desperation as they waited outside the school on friday. >> i know exactly what she was wearing. i was going to see her black the glittery uggs should put on this morning. >> there was still hope because the children were hiding. >> then hope departed. >> there was so much panic and confusion. life was sucked out of everyone in the room. i found a state trooper and was like are there any survivors? are you telling me that standing here as a parent my child is gone and? he said yes. >> in the drizzle outside
for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news america." >> this is a special addition -- addition reporting live from newtown, conn.. heartbreaking farewell. of the first of the funerals of the 26 people killed in america's deadliest school shootings. in response, the u.s. lawmakers about action. tipping point?he >> this is an outrage. we are killing each other. we are the only industrialized country in the world of doing it. to >> at least nine afghan girls are killed by a landmine while collecting firewood. it raises questions about these weapons of war. >> welcome to this special edition of "bbc world news america." this community is warning the loss of 26 people including 20 children killed in a school on friday. it has ignited a debate about gun control in america. today was about the children, i got little noah and little jack pinto, to six girls who were buried today. it should a community struggling with grief and with shock. we have the latest. >> the agony of this week town was almost unbearable. first jack pinto was also burie
in 2002, the kid, and basically we believe that america has a responsibility to be involved in the world in protection of our values and our strategic interests, all of which helps us be safer and freer here at home and it's just grown. >> senator graham, what is the secret to proper bipartisanship, do you think? >> well, in fairness to our colleagues, pierce, there's a lot of real close friendships around this place. there's a lot of republicans and democrat who get along very well and work together. the reason you're talking about the three of us, i think, is because of 9/11. there had never been an attack on america, we would have been three friends who travel and socialize, but what brought us together and put us on the map, after we were attacked on 9/11, everything in our country changed and throughout the world. as a result of 9/11 and all the national security issues that followed, our friendship became a cause. it really did solidify over the iraq war. bipartisanship as hyped is being willing to lose your job. i really admire john because he suffered for our country. and i hang
>> this is "bbc world news america." funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news america." >> hello and welcome to "bbc world news." a very happy new year 2013. it is already a first of january were you are, this is the greek capital and they're celebrating going around the acropolis. various time zones are coming into the year 2013 and we will keep you up-to-date. not a lot to look at their in athens but we will show you the scene in capital across the next few hours on bbc. there is still a lot of work going on on capitol hill. president obama said a deal is in sight to stop america going over the so-called fiscal cliff. congress officials have said the house of representati
of that has left america. we still are a world leader when it comes to complex, advanced manufacturing. we make almost 80% of our steel here. we make tremendous amount of planes here, and we're neck-and-neck in manufacturing with china. now, that is a staggering statistic. we make 20% of the world's goods with about 10% of our economy. china makes about 20% of the world's goods with 40% of its economy. we are neck-and-neck as a manufacturer, and it's due to a six-time productivity advantage that we enjoy over china when it comes to manufacturing, and we even have a productivity advantage over countries like japan and germany, countries thought of as manufacturing leaders. i wondered, and i started asking myself, well, what is it that gives us this productivity advantage? what is it that gives american manufacturers this ability to compete? i wanted to go and talk to rail manufacturers because one of the things that when you're in washington and in bureaucracies, you know, you have a lot of people pontificating about the state of american manufacturing and what we need to do without actuall
. .. there would be a change in mr. dsm point, that that might affect america. as the senate are not aware that any change to the treaty in order to go into effect and has any impact on the united states would require the nascent consent? without the advice and consent of the senate, no change could possibly impact united states. >> outhouses the bureaucrats running the program would have clarification word is otherwise vague. the point i am making here is we don't really need to do that when we have her hearing. i understand there's a difference of opinion on this and a lot of motion. i found this morning's roll call magazine, all the people find appeared with the distinguished senator from massachusetts. it doesn't say anything in the articles that certainly attacks the emotions of individuals. so yes, i am not satisfied they would not interfere and do their clarification to change the intent. >> we've taken care of our problem here. >> the mr. president, it's important in this kind of debate as to make a judgment as senators that we base our judgment on facts than on the reality. the senator has
bragging about them. they post signs advertising them. in doing so they tell every insane killer in america that schools are the safest place to inflict maximum mayhem with minimum risk. however our nation's priorities gotten so far out of order? think about it. we care about our money, so we protect our banks with armed guards. american airports, office buildings, power plants, courthouses, even sports stadiums are all protected by armed security. we care about our president so we protect him with armed secret service agents. members of congress work in offices surrounded by capitol police officers. yet when it comes to our most beloved, innocent, and vulnerable members of the american family, our children, we as a society leave them every day utterly defenseless. the monsters and the predators of the world know it and exploit it. that must change now. the truth is -- >> nra, stop killing our children. it is the nra killing our children. not armed -- not armed teachers. we have to end the violence. we have to stop the killing. stop the killing in our schools. stop the killing in our homes.
he reportedly has all of the nurses charm he's well cared for. get well soon mr. president. america loves you. [ applause ] before we go thank you to governoruc had huck for trusting me to fill in for him this week . thank you, audience for being here, good night. [ applause ] ♪ >> socialism. the new craze. >> i am not a liberal. >> i was raised a socialist. my families are not liberals. they were socialists. >> we collected some great hollywood interviews and it all starts right now. >> once upon a time you and i actually felt journalism was a calling. >> i still think i'm doing something noble. >> caution. you are about to enter the no-spin zone. the factor begins right now. >> him bill o'reilly. thanks for watching "the factor goes holy" actors yuck nor russian james kaan, kelsy grammar have something to say about how this done hi tri-has changed. >> if we look at history, our greet country and freedom are under attack. we're at a tipping point and quite possibly our country as woe know it may be lost forever if we don't change the course our countried headed. >> you're saying,
that were necessary to achieve the long-term bipartisan debt-reduction program that america desperately needs. we're over $16.4 trillion in debt. i'm in my last days as a u.s. senator. if you'd told me when i started that we'd be $16 trillion in debt, i wouldn't have believed it. frankly, if you told me just a dozen years ago at the end of the clinton administration when we were in surplus that we could possibly be $16 trillion in de debt, i would have thought -- well, i would have thought you were not reality-tested. but here we are, and most everybody knows that the way we're going to get out of this is with a combination of tough medicine. i call it tough love. we're going to have to reduce spend, and we can't do it all from discretionary spending. and the budget control act that we adopted last summer -- that is, the sum o summer of 2011 --s it all from discretionary spending. what's discretionary spending? it's different from entitlement spending -- medicare, medicaid, et cetera. it's what most people think of as the government. it's education programs, it's environmental protectio
myself, you know, what's the america that we'd like to see for these children when they grow up? what is the america that we're headed towards if we don't correct ourselves? i believe it's still possible to build an attractive future in, say, 2050 for today's children, but it won't be easy, and we haven't got much time to do it. so what does that future look like, how do we get there and what do we do now? these are the questions that i address in the book. and i want to talk about four points that correspond to the four parts of the book. the first is the imperative of system change. if we look at the conditions and trends in our country today, we have to admit it's damn distressing. you know, in the book i review a huge load of problems afflicting our country economically, environmentally, socially, politically and conclude that what we have is a bad case of system failure. and, thus, the imperative of system change. when you have encompassing problems spreading across the entire national landscape, it can't be for small reasons. it's the system, stupid. and we live and work in this
of the impetus for prioritizing the issue of poverty came from the other america, a best-selling study of poverty by holy cross alumnus michael harrington who found poverty hidden in appalachia and if america's inner -- and in america's inner cities. shriver accepted the challenge and got to work first of all researching the scope of the problem and its possible solutions. he found 30 million americans then live anything poverty -- living in poverty, and his agenda for them was not handouts, but employment through programs like the preschool head start program, a job corps to retrain adults for an increasingly postindustrial economy and vista, volunteers in service to america, often described as a domestic peace corps. there were programs stressing community leadership, local planning with federal funds, and there were legal services for the poor. in time the war on poverty raised up resentment from some public officials who were challenged by the fewly-empowered poor. newly-empowered poor. meanwhile, slowly but inexorably, the war in vietnam drew funding away from slave's operation. offered a ch
that have made america a beacon of hope and freedom. many yearn for basic human liberties. the people of western sa harrah have been trapped in oppressive conditions under the puppet regime. the front has instituted masked kidnappings of people from their homes into western algeria. they have been in prison in camps for 35 years. the front colbrates with the likes of cuba who ration food in the camp and indoctor rin ate children while partnering with al qaeda. they have a plan, which i will submit for the record that addresses these issues with a clear and democratic solution to the sa harrah crisis. this is where america support should lie. mr. speaker, the united states can and must continue to advance fundamental human rights as we in this chamber continue to work together for peace, justice and human dignity in the western sahara. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. are there further requests for one-minute speeches? the house will be in order. members and staff, remove your conversations off the floor. under the speaker's announced policy o
on this. >> in his commentary he quoted another -- >> it was a figure leaf. >> got bless america that jason wit lock and bob costas and people of their ilk are actually speelking about their issues instead of chris kol ing worth being tough quarterback for the bears after receiving a concussi concussion. >> i've got to blow the whistle. thanks for joining us this morning. >>> coming back. a secret tape recorder. was robert ales cvently pushes david petraeus to run for president? people have doubts about taking aspirin for pain. but they haven't experienced extra strength bayer advanced aspirin. in fact, in a recent survey, 95% of people who tried it agreed that it relieved their headache fast. visit fastreliefchallenge.com today for a special trial offer. bp has paid overthe people of bp twenty-threeitment to the gulf. billion dollars to help those affected and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open, and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. and bp's also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than a
monday and was 88. later on, national rifle association offers its ideas for protecting america's children from the school shootings. coming up next, american vet should be on his way home after his mexican vacation. turned in to a nightmare. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] campbell's green bean casserole. it's amazing what soup can do [ coughs ] [ baby crying ] ♪ [ male announcer ] robitussin® liquid formula soothes your throat on contact and the active ingredient relieves your cough. robitussin®. don't suffer the coughequences™. meet the 5-passenger ford c-max hybrid. and the active ingredient relieves your cough. when you're carrying a lot of weight, c-max has a nice little trait, you see, c-max helps you load your freight, with its foot-activated lift gate. but that's not all you'll see, cause c-max also beats prius v, with better mpg. say hi to the all-new 47 combined mpg c-max hybrid. stop! stop! stop! come back here! humans -- we are beautifully imperfect creatures living in an imperfect world. that's why liberty mutual insurance has your back with great ideas like our o
is based on the david and goliath narrative. big is bad, small is good. so big things like america, the military, breakfast buffets are seen as evil and people can make fun of them. when you are in europe you can make fun of how americans are. i lived there for three years of of the small things however are seen as somewhat heroic. pair troopers are seen as freedom fighters because they are small. ows was a tiny faction was seen as cool and activism is and dana perino. [laughter] the media embraces david over goliath even if david is evil. if america were a house, the left would move to the -- i used that before and it worked. i'm not trying to say that the left are bad people. i'm just saying that they are not people. [laughter] no, no, no, not true. why i say that is because that is what they do. even if it's a joke. they are people. they are some of my favorite people but they don't own the turf that is ridiculed. so why is the uncool thing important to win an election? the reason people like barack obama is because he is cool. he is a community activist, an organizer. how did t
-cared for. get well soon, mr. president. america loves you. america loves you. [applause]. captioned by closed captioning services, inc. before we go thank you to governor before we go another thank you to governor huckabee for trusting me to fill in for him this week and thank you, audience for being here. good night. [applause] p liberals. they are socialists.s. >> we had a lot of great interviews and it all starts right now. >> once upon a time you and i thought journalism was a call. >> i still think i am doing something noble. (laughter) >> caution. you are about to enter the no spin zone. "the factor" begins right now. >> hi. i am bill o'reilly. thank you for watching "the factor goes hollywood special." top story conservative hollywood. actors chuck norris, james caan kelsey grammar have something to say about how things have gone over the years. we begin with chuck norris. >> if we look at history our great country and freedom are under attack. we are at a tipping point and quite possibly our country as we know it may be lost forever if we don't change the course our country
for you to do in kandahar. >> rajiv chandrasekeran, here is his most recent book, "little america: the war within the war for afghanistan." he has been our guest here on booktv on c-span2. thank you, sir. >> thank you. real pleasure. >> visit booktv.org to watch any of the programs you see here online. type the author or book title in the search bar on the upper left side of the page. click search. you can share anything you see on booktv.org easily by clicking share on the upper left side of the page and selecting the format. booktv streams live online for 48 hours every weekend with top nonfiction books and authors. tv.org. >> next, former speaker of the house newt gingrich presents the second book in his historical fiction series on george washington, "victory at yorktown" but it's a little over an hour. >> good evening, everyone. my name is john, and i had the honor of being executive director of the ronald reagan presidential foundation, and it's my pleasure to welcome all of you here on this rainy evening. in honor of our men and women in uniform who defend our freedom arou
america should play an important role in this. but right now i think our voice has been largely muted by internal divisions, by some ways that we do business in a government and outside of government, that's awesome. the main argument is it's up on us, and more is coming. changes coming. some of that will include islamist forces to figure how to best use our power to shape and influence them. >> thank you very much. on iraq, an extra bonus points if you can believe that -- >> a couple of close in points. first, we we think a luckily, made out to say myself, i think generally weak tend to project a certain bigotry of low expectations on muslims in the arab cultural world. which is those of us who are of various religious faiths here, we know the extent to which we practice our faith to this or that religious prescription, and we now that we've all pretty darn sure but we think muslims, they all pray five times a day, they never touched scotch. they all do, you know, every commandment that is in islam, and, of course, they all submit to the will of their local imam, et cetera, et cetera
are the challenges that you face trying to make a product in america? >> governor, i never miss a marketing opportunity. on my way in a lot of the steel in your office is made by small companies like mine. the steel that holds up your lights moves your booms, the steel underneath the chairs in the audience. >> that is paper under there. >> be careful out there audience. >> it is made like companies like mine. we are a small steel manufacturer. we started in 93. our product is a commodity product. the steel we sell is the same as the steel made in china or india. there is a big difference, though. in america the rates from much higher. how does the company like mine compete in a global environment where products from china and india and europe are crashing on our shores? >> they are dumping product by having government subsidies to chien needs products that are often then subsidized so they can put you guys out of business on the entire market. that's what a lot of americans don't understand. it's frustrating to me. >> there is probably an even more important point about the product that is
wanted to introduce the korean cabbage dish kim chi to america. she created mother-in-law's kimchi. using nonethnic packaging to appeal to a mass market and carried in whole foods and fresh markets. [ male announcer ] feeling like a shadow of your former self? c'mon, michael! get in the game! [ male announcer ] don't have the hops for hoops with your buddies? lost your appetite for romance? and your mood is on its way down. you might not just be getting older. you might have a treatable condition called low testosterone or low t. millions of men, forty-five or older, may have low t. so talk to your doctor about low t. hey, michael! [ male announcer ] and step out of the shadows. hi! how are you? [ male announcer ] learn more at isitlowt.com. [ laughs ] hey! military families face, we understand. at usaa, we know military life is different. we've been there. that's why every bit of financial advice we offer is geared specifically to current and former military members and their families. [ laughs ] dad! dad! [ applause ] ♪ [ male announcer ] life brings obstacles. usaa brings adv
>>> five things america is talking about tonight. number one, a fiery car crash. one dallas cowboys player arrested, another dead. >> it's something you don't want to believe. you think you're going to wake up out of a dream. >> number two, bob costas, what he says about the latest nfl tragedy and what he says now about this controversial halftime comments about guns. >> there is a gun culture in the national football league. >> number three, can president obama get his way in washington? >> everybody says we agree with it. let's get it done. >> number four, a daring rescue sees one navy s.e.a.l. dead. >> number five, the dede deejay royal prank. >> we're so sorry that this has happened to them. >> i'll talk about all of that and more with my guests in new york, washington, and around the country. this is "piers morgan tonight." >> good evening. a big story tonight. another nfl tragedy, another grieving family. teammates and fans left asking one question, why? a week after the kansas city chiefs jovan belcher killed the mother of his baby and killed himself, a fiery car crash leaves
there was a terrorist attack on america. and though we suffered a horrific attack, the strength, resilience and extraordinary acts of kindness of the american people showed the world that attempts to destroy our way of life would never succeed. on that day, no one could get in or out of washington, and many communication networks were inoperable. so when the pentagon was hit, and the capitol was evacuated, my staff and i walked one block to my home on capitol hill. just as example, the husband of my office manager worked in the section of the pentagon had been hit, so we were on the phone, the one phone that we had, the hospitals, the police, anyone that we thought might be able to tell us if he was safe. thankfully, he was fine. but there were so many who waited for hours, who called hospitals to hear from their loved ones. sometimes the news was a relief, and sometimes they waited in vain for good news. and i have to say that it was an incredible moment when the senators who could find each other, where ever they had gone from the capital, we finally gathered early -- well, late afternoon
. more horrendous than anything i thought could happen in the united states of america. these massacres are happening in our shopping malls, our movie theaters, our businesses in our offices. in the only thing consistent and all of them is the guns. i would like to introduce one of our co-sponsors of the legislation we hope to introduce a lot with the house of representatives, the senior senator from the greek state of connecticut going -- the great state of connecticut going through a difficult time. >> thank you. let me first thank you for your leadership going back to 1993 and before when i was speaking to advocate in the state of connecticut a similar law to the one adopted here banning assault weapons. this has been a heroin, terrific week in the state of connecticut, culminating in today's moment of silence at 9:30. the end of the week and i spent the better part of the time meeting with first responders, families, going to funerals and wakes and speaking with ordinary people of newtown and the state of connecticut. the refrain i have heard over and over again from newtown and con
weeks later, more than 10,000 of us, people from all over america, started walking from selma to montgomery. and by the time we made it to montgomery five days later, there were almost 30,000 black and white citizens-protestant, catholic, jewish, men, women, young people. it was like a holy march. and the congress debated the act, passed it, and on august 6, 1965, president lyndon johnson signed it into law. amy goodman: congressmember john lewis. we continue our conversation after break. [break] amy goodman: the morehouse college glee club performing "we shall overcome." morehouse college was the alma mater of dr. martin luther king jr. this is democracy now!, democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman, as i continue with my interview with democratic congressmember john lewis of georgia, leader of the civil rights movement, risked his life numerous times marching for the right of all americans to vote. during the civil rights movement, he marched side by side with dr. king. he served as chair of the student nonviolent coordinating committee, helped organize t
spent $16 billion in three weeks. but america was not going to disappear. it was -- there was panic, no question about it. and we were -- the dominos were toppling and everything, but america wasn't going to go away. >> you had confidence in america. >> sure. >> i remember mika and i went over, i forget where it was, but we went over to host an event, a roundtable, simpson/bowles, and as we were walking in, one person after another, they were all talking about you, and not about how you were brilliant or how you were rich. they all talked about the confidence you had in america, while everybody else is talking about a rise in china, everybody else was talking about how we were collapsing, they said, you should have heard what warren buffett said. the guy is more bullish on america than ever before. why is that? >> how could you be otherwise? we've come through a civil war, two world wars, the great depression, you name it. and this country works. just look where we were in 1776 and where we are now. >> i here the president talking about moving the top tax rate up to 39.6%. and i'm j
you think the system of justice works in belize like it does in america? it does not. >> reporter: since his glory days in the '80s and '90s, pioneering that anti-virus sopt ware that still pops up on millions of computers, muck afee's journey has twisted and turned. in 2009, he lick by dated his assets, telling "nightline" -- >> it's been reported you are worth $100 million. >> that may have been true. >> reporter: then, he moved to belize and bought this seaside compound. but the skies darkened for him, he said, when he refused to bribe the government. he started a company that turned jungle plants into med sun, but he says, his failure to bribe brought on a raid on his lab last may, on suspicion he was manufacturing meth. he was never charged. then, last month, just a day after four of his dogs were poisoned, his neighbor, faull, was found shot in the head. weeks earlier, say officials, this petition, obtained by abc news, complaining of mcafee's shotgun slinging security guards and his vicious dogs. >> he loved dogs. he couldn't hurt or harm anyone's dogs. we didn't get along.
works. there are examples around the work. even in america with lax weak gun protections there are in fact some regulations in some places and they make a difference. let's treat gun violence like any public health crisis which i would say losing 30,000 lives a year would qualify as a crisis. we need to treat it like the threat to public health and families that it is, treat a gun like any other consumer product. this is how we slash the death rate. enforcement and education. for guns it starts when congress stops being intimidated by the extremists and then just do what the majority of gun owners agree we should do. we new the assault weapon ban which maybe we'll introduce under the leadership of our dear friend and colleague, care lynn mccarthy. close the gun show loophole. for starters, things that n.r.a. members agree with. let's care as much about real guns as we do about toy gun consumer protection. to start us down the road of making our children safer by treating children's gun safety like their auto safety. all the air bags, anti-drunk driving campaigns, child se
senator that's done more to help america's heroes adjust to life after the military. that's just one of the reasons why she will be sorely missed. here's another reason, though: kay has fought time and time again to promote tax relief for hardworking texas families. in thehooin the mid-1990's, shed create the so-called homemaker ira to make sure that stay-at-home moms and dads were able to save for their retirement on an equal basis with their counterparts who worked outside the home. i now it is one of her proudest achievements and i'm proud to join with the senator from merrell, senator barbara mikulski, in attempting to rename this ira the kay bailey hutchison spousal ira in her honor, and i hope, mr. president, we can join together and honor senator hutchison by getting that done before we close out our business this year. kay, of course, has always championed the state sales tax deduction, which may not seem like a big deal to others in this carriage carriages but it . but it is a big deal in texas. we don't have a state income tax. but we do pay a state sales tax. and of course
, from the passion to the anger to the obsession. what comes next for america and its weapons? from the global resources of abc news, with terry moran, cynthia mcfadden, and bill weir in new york city, this is a special edition of "nightline" -- a day in the life of the american gun. >>> good evening. i'm bill weir. so how does it feel to live in the most heavily armed society in human history? do you take fear or comfort from the fact that this country holds three times more gun stores than mcdonald's restaurants? for many, it took a slaughter of 26 women and children to start talking about the 34 americans shot to death every day, and that talk has many others lining up to buy their first gun. so at this moment of national conversation in a search to understand the complexities driving both sides, "nightline" teams fanned out across one nation under the gun and deeply divided. philadelphia, 7:30 p.m. sergeant john hoyt works overnight. a shift that makes a reasonable man question how anyone could call this the city of brotherly love. and just moments into his night, it begins. >>
the dead in newtown, connecticut, and all week, the argument over the kind of guns available in america and the kind of people that can get all of them. it has gone back and forth. while the fire he said raged, the gunman killed himself. he had already spent 17 years in prison for killing his grandmother. as a convicted criminal, he was not allowed to possess firearms. a cold christmas awaits the families of two firefighters. bbc news, washington. >> in afghanistan, at least seven security officials including an american adviser have been killed by local police officers. in the first shooting, a policewoman opened fire inside the police headquarters, killing the americans. it is the first time a female member of the afghan services has turned on a member of the nato force. a report. >> the 33-year-old was a sergeant with the afghan national police, and earlier this morning, the woman shot and killed a civilian adviser. according to officials, she had planned to kill senior afghan officials but could not find any so shot the advisor instead. at the police headquarters, it is one of the m
out their vote and is going to be exploited by virtually every merchandiser in america. >> obama's campaign manager and the rest of the team for the ground game they pulled together which the romney team laughed at first. they are not laughing now. >> mark. >> thank you. magnificent. >> is this it? >> let's see what conac has given us. the biggest winner of 2012 vladimir putin. he overcame massive opposition protests, maneuvered through constitutional loopholes, served as president, then prime minister. and then when re-elected as president again of planet earth's biggest nation, russia. vladimir putin biggest winner of 2012. >> "biggest loser," pat? >> general david petraeus. cia most famous general of his generation caught in a honey trap and kwon. >> the nra national rifle association which has no answer to why americans should be allowed to buy and possess assault weapons with rounds they can shoot off and kill little children. >> mark. >> the 23 million americans who remain out of work and have been out of work for a long period of time. >> seldom aidle son who backed candid
. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news america." >> this is bbc world news america. reporting from washington, i'm kathy kaye. supporters and opponents in egypt of president morsi fight outside the palace in cairo. villages are flattened and hundreds are killed. and remembering the legendary jazzd of dave brubeck, pianist whose impact went far beyond the world of music. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and elsewhere around the globe. in egypt tonight, pitched battles on the streets of cairo and -- between supporters and opponents of the president there. there have been violent clashes for the second day outside the presidential power us -- palace in cairo. demonstrators have been during petrol bombs. four senior advisers have resigned. what are the chances for a peaceful resolution? that is the question i asked the state department spokesman p.j. crowley. >> we have had the former head of the iaea suggesting that morsi is now worse than hosni mubarak. is getting quite tense there, isn't it? >> it is. and the tension between institutions is actu
to reduce gun violence in america. so what that might be is a mystery. we'll tell what you has worked in some other countries. >> she was the type of person that could just light up a room. she is an incredible person and i'm so blessed to be her dad. >> american children are 13 times more likely to be murdered here than in other developed nations. why? we will try to answer that question. >> hiding behind the second amendment doesn't cut it anymore. it's time our lawmakers realize that society has changed. >> it took just minutes for some far left pundits to exploit the terrible murders in connecticut for political purposes. bernie goldberg will have thoughts on that. caution. you are about to enter the no spin zone. "the factor" begins right now. >> hi. i'm bill o'reilly. thanks for watching us tonight. what do we do, what do we do about violent evil? that is the subject of this evening's talking points memo. having done extensive research on lee harvey oswald for "killing kennedy," i snow something about violent evil i. saw it firsthand in el salvador and the middle east and i sat
not want to give support. they do not agree with anything he does. whether it helps america or defeats america. they made up their mind whatever obama's as we are against it. if that helps america, it does not matter because we said over eight years ago we did not want him and will not support anything he does. we want the white house back -- in essence what they are doing they are making it better for america. the republicans will never return to the white house because they will never be for all americans. guest: george reminds me of a great line from a groucho marx movie but soup -- whatever it is, i am against it. that is a refrain in the song in the movie by the marx brothers. it is kind of what it seems like with some of the tea party republicans, what ever it is obama comes up with, they are against it. that is not how we move the country forward on any number of issues and certainly not regarding the fiscal cliff negotiations. the president has put forward a plan that includes about $1.20 trillion in tax revenue by increasing the tax rate on people making $400,000 of income are
a burst of wildberry flavor. now why make a flavored heartburn pill? because this is america. and we don't just make things you want, we make things you didn't even know you wanted. like a spoon fork. spray cheese. and jeans made out of sweatpants. so grab yourself some new prilosec otc wildberry. [ male announcer ] one pill each morning. 24 hours. zero heartburn. satisfaction guaranteed or your money back. >>> nobody can get 100% of what they want and this is not simply a contest in terms of parties in terms of who looks good who doesn't. there are real world consequences to what we do here. >> after that the president moved to hawaii and that's where he is today. the congress is back home for the holidays and you have the fiscal cliff, that's still looming and as they call for armed guards in all of the nation's schools we'll talk to kasim reed, mayor of atlanta and one of the people around the country who say we need fewer gun, not more. >>> as millions travel home for the holidays, stay tuned for that. good day. i'm richard lui at the top of the hour and just two days to go before th
by america's cable companies in 1979 luft. >>> president obama meets with house and senate leaders from both parties this afternoon at the white house that meeting is scheduled for 3:00 eastern in the oval office. politico rights leader's side is hopeful there will be a breakthrough on preventing the tax increases and spending cuts scheduled to take effect on january 1st. earlier today senator tom harkin held and even outside of the capitol about the fiscal cliff. he called it a battle for the middle class. we will also hear from congressman chris van hollen and members of advocacy groups. >> are we ready? okay. good morning. all right. good morning. welcome to this cold morning press conference here outside of the senate office building. i am the executive director of network and i am one of them on the bus. we're here to continue the message, grizzlies to find a solution to the economic situation that we are facing. we gather today as a broad coalition through all sorts of members of the washington advocacy community and folks from all around the country to stand here together to say we ne
that america needs to go back to work. it's just a matter of having the will to do it, the programs are out there. compromise can be made around the streamlining of regulations to make sure that we are putting people back to work. if chris christy and barack obama can get -- chris cristie and barack obama can get together on that, and i know what's transpired and how the impact of our infrastructure has taken place along the eastern seaboard, it's something we ought to be able to rally around immediately. and of course everyone, everyone deserves a $250,000 tax break. we all agree on that. so why not just simply adopt it and then come back and we'll have time to address the issues as it relates to bending the cost curve on health care and focusing on the vast inefficiencies, the fraud, the abuse and the waste that totals more than $750 billion annually? as for the chairman from my district said, list, it would be a way for us to bring down the deficit but also make health care affordable, accessible and functional for the american people. something i believe we must do. with that let me int
of true faith and of courage. and i hope he comes here to america to speak your. i think he has a good message. you're not supposed to be reading. >> i know. but there was something -- i have many more questions, but i think i will focus lastly on one issue that's been, comes out powerful in the book. i recall when you were talking about, it comes up in different ways. that when you're talking about the issue of jews from muslim countries, you mentioned, i guess you asked someone or someone was asked why didn't these jews make a big deal out of this. and one of the things, and one person responded, said we were just not about looking back. we were about starting over and rebuilding, and that's what we are today. i mean, it's true today that there's more of, there's an attempt to raise this issue. i think partially because people, it has a bearing on the question of the palestinian refugees, but otherwise, the people were not inclined really to raise it. it was more about getting on with life and building a new life. similarly, in an odd way not willing on death, which is another aspect
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